5 Things You Need to Know About an Aquascan

March 30, 2020 10:25 am

Are you trying to get pregnant? Has your IVF been unsuccessful?
Unfortunately implantation failure or miscarriage can occur if there is an undetected abnormality in the womb.

Saline infusion sonography, otherwise known as an Aquascan, can be used to examine the uterine cavity (womb) and help to identify any abnormalities, such as fibroids and polyps. These irregularities can affect implantation and pregnancy if not treated.

An Aquascan is an internal ultrasound scan, where a saline solution is passed into the uterus using a catheter. This helps to capture internal images of the outline of the womb.

If you are considering an Aquascan because you are trying to get pregnant, either naturally or with the help of a fertility treatment, here are five things you need to know…

  • An Aquascan is an invasive procedure that can be quickly and easily performed in around 30 minutes. The majority of this time is spent scanning the uterine cavity, before and after the saline solution has been inserted – this part of the procedure only takes a couple of minutes.
  • No anaesthetic is required. However, we recommend that you take a standard painkiller, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen one hour before the procedure. Should you develop any pelvic pain following the procedure, you should inform your doctor.
  • The procedure should be performed after menstruation, in the first half of the cycle. This is typically sometime between days five and twelve. This scan should be not be performed if a patient is pregnant or suspected to be pregnant. An Aquascan is also not advised if you have any pelvic pain or discomfort leading up to your appointment.
  • Patients should empty their bladder before the Aquascan and it is recommended that you avoid intercourse from the first day of your current menstrual period.
  • Immediately after your scan the specialist will explain their findings to you and your report is usually available before you leave the clinic. Images can be sent to your doctor or a clinic for further assessment.

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This post was written by Concept Fertility